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Saturday, October 22, 2016
Grace Livingston Hill

Grace Livingston Hill

Grace Livingston Hill (1865-1947), the pioneer of Christian romance, wrote over one hundred faith-inspired books during her lifetime. When her first husband died leaving her with two daughters to raise, writing became a way to make a living, but she always recognized storytelling as a way to share her faith in God. She has sold over 84 million copies and is still loved by young and old alike.
Reintroducing the Romantic Tales of Grace Livingston Hill

Reintroducing the Romantic Tales of Grace Livingston Hill

(October 2012)
Christa A. Banister
Although she was born in 1865 and passed away in 1947, Grace Livingston Hill is proof positive that truly great stories never go out of style.

Known for her sweeping, romantically charged tales that paired strong, forward-thinking women with equally take-charge, heroic men, Livingston Hill’s lively protagonists experienced many of the same joys and trials that people can relate to today.

In the same way Jane Austen’s work has resonated with audiences of all ages and backgrounds, Barbour Books is hoping to reinvigorate and expand Livingston Hill’s fan base by re-releasing a new title (a total of 60) monthly via an exclusive book club found at

“This would provide readers who are already familiar with Grace the opportunity to go back and reread their favorites, or if they didn’t collect them all earlier now they can,” says Barbour’s Senior Editor of Romance/Women’s Fiction, Rebecca Germany. “Collecting them all is really the idea behind the book club. For readers who want to read all her titles, this is an ideal way to make sure you don’t miss any.”

So what is it exactly that makes Livingston Hill’s work stand the test of time? Well, Barbour’s Vice President of Publishing, MaryBurns, says it’s because she wrote about life as she observed it.

“She had the unique advantage of a writer to have lived through wonderful and drastic changes in history’s timeline. Born in 1865, she knew life before electricity and cars, and she saw how the American frontier was settled and states formed,” Burns says. “She lived through the Spanish-American War, World War I and World War II, as well as times of depression and times of excess, epidemics and political changes [including] the temperance movement and the campaign for women to vote.”

More importantly, her books are practical lessons in history that ultimately point the reader to the gospel and showcase how the Christian message should be lived.

This article originally appeared in the September/October 2012 issue of FamilyFiction digital magazine. Subscribe for free today!



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